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ING DIRECT appoints new APAC chief economist

ING DIRECT appoints new APAC chief economist

A non-major lender has appointed a new chief economist and head of research for the Asia-Pacific region.

Effective 1 July, Rob Carnell, currently chief international economist at ING Bank will step into the chief economist and head of research Asia-Pacific role.

Mr Carnell will be responsible for heading the research management covering all of Asia, Australia and New Zealand. The role follows nearly 13 years working at ING Bank. Mr Carnell previously headed the coverage of the US economy and Eurozone economics for ING financial markets.

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He’s also credited with being one of the first marketing economists to correctly predict the onset of the US housing collapse and ensuing GFC in 2008.

His appointment will fill the gap left by Tim Condon who will retire at the end of June. Mr Condon began working with ING Barings in 1999, leading the economic and financial markets research for Asia (excluding Japan).

Gerrit Stoelinga, head of ING wholesale banking Asia said the bank was “fortunate” to have Mr Carnell replace Mr Condon, adding: “Over the years, our clients have highly appreciated Tim’s strong views on political events and macro-trends in the region.”

[Related: Bank launches new credit card following broker feedback

ING DIRECT appoints new APAC chief economist
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