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Securitiser assets grow to $3.7bn: ABS

Securitiser assets grow to $3.7bn: ABS

Australian securitisers’ residential mortgage assets grew by 4.8 per cent in the June quarter, bringing total assets to $125.3 billion. 

Further, the overall $3.7 billion growth in Australian securitisers’ total assets reflects a 3.0 per cent increase on the March 2017 quarter.

That’s according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Assets and Liabilities of Australian Securitisers update for the June quarter, released 7 September.

The quarterly release of securitisers’ assets and liabilities also revealed that the dollar value of securitisers’ residential mortgage books came to $99.7 billion, up by 4.8 per cent from the March quarter’s $95.2 billion.

Liabilities

Australian securitisers registered an increase in total liabilities of 3.0 per cent to $125.3 billion.

Within this, $111.3 billion came from domestically issued asset-backed securities (up by 3.3 per cent) and $4.0 billion in asset-backed securities issued offshore, down by 13.3 per cent on the March quarter figure.

Of asset-backed securities issued domestically, $108.0 billion were long term, up from $105.2 billion in the previous, and $3.3 billion were short term, also up from $2.6 billion.

Loans and placements came to $9.5 billion, up from $8.8 billion on the previous quarter.

[Related: Apartment approvals nosedive by nearly 30%]

Securitiser assets grow to $3.7bn: ABS
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