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Recent 'panic' selling reminiscent of GFC

Recent 'panic' selling reminiscent of GFC

A stretch of uncertainty in global investment markets could see volatility become the 'new normal', an Australian academic claims.

Deakin University finance associate professor Victor Fang said the recent volatility in Greek and Chinese markets has prompted property and share owners to pull out of equity markets.

“The perfect storm of Greece defaulting on its international obligations and a rapid meltdown of China’s sharemarket has knocked the confidence of Australian investors in a way not seen since the global financial crisis," he said.

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“The uncertainty in Greece and China means investors are pulling out of equity markets and flocking to the relative safe haven of government bonds. As long as uncertainty and fear rule, the rollercoaster ride will continue for Australian investors."

Mr Fang said while both countries will impact Australian markets, ongoing volatility in China will have a longer-lasting effect than turmoil in Greece.

“People say: ‘But Australia isn’t paying Greece’s bills’ and ‘I don’t invest in China’s share market’; but the interconnectedness of global financial markets means we’re still impacted by what’s happening overseas," he said.

“Both are bad news for Australian investors, but China is our biggest trading partner and its growth is closely tied to our commodity prospects – so it’s the one to watch."

Recent 'panic' selling reminiscent of GFC
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